Author Topic: Finished playing...  (Read 134757 times)

Snique

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #645 on: June 21, 2019, 04:05:03 PM »
Borderlands: the Pre-Sequel

With Borderlands 3 on the approach I realized I still had this sitting unplayed in my library and figured I'd haul it out. It's... OK. It has a few neat new things, lots of more of the same, a lot of Australian accents and jokes (having been made in Australia) and that's about it. Finishing one playthrough unlocked other "modes" but I wasn't motivated to try them.

The game held up pretty well, given its age, though it did have an unfortunate glitch that locked up my PC to the point of requiring a reboot. Borderlands animations have never been a thing and this fits into the same cartoonish style the series uses. Even so it's a little weird that the NPCs don't track you as you move around them and the movements are a little janky.

But that's not what we're here for - we're here for the guns. Of which there are a fair number. I did all the side missions I could be arsed to do (I hate the timed ones and the super-parkour ones) and I still had problems getting weapons that were good for my level. When it takes three headshot sniper crits to put down a regular mob that means you're unpleasantly underpowered and that cut into my fun. Also, some of the spawns are obnoxious with the hardest mobs spawning first and often right on top of you. Dying to that was almost as obnoxious as dying to map glitches, which happened maybe half a dozen times on my playthrough.

Generally, I can see what they were aiming for. With some polish to smooth things out and a tiny bit more attention to level design this would've been a lot more fun. As is... meh. Get it cheap or if you're really into the Borderlands style, otherwise wait for 3.

Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #646 on: June 21, 2019, 07:01:02 PM »
But that's not what we're here for - we're here for the guns. Of which there are a fair number. I did all the side missions I could be arsed to do (I hate the timed ones and the super-parkour ones) and I still had problems getting weapons that were good for my level.
One option when you feel underpowered in a Borderlands game is to look up "shift codes" online (just google "borderlands pre-sequel shift codes" or similarly for BL2) and use them to open the golden chest in the main hub.  I don't think I did this in the pre-sequel, since using the golden chest felt pretty overpowered in BL2 when I tried it.

(There weren't shift codes in BL1 originally, but there are in the recently remastered version.)

Snique

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #647 on: June 22, 2019, 10:09:37 AM »
Thanks, that's an idea. I still haven't figured out how to play the DLC that I think I have so maybe I'll try that if I figure out how...

Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #648 on: July 27, 2019, 08:09:03 PM »
Assassin's Creed: Relevations (I think I still have a Desmond memory sequence to unlock).  I enjoyed this installment better than Brotherhood; the storyline was more interesting, some of the more annoying systems from Brotherhood were streamlined a bit, and the climbing tended to be less problematic (the controls still aren't necessarily good but the levels are designed not to be affected as much; from what I can tell that continues to be the theme in later AC games).  I'm still not a great fan of the "100% sync" challenges, but they don't gate anything important.  The engine continues not to be great; I had to look up a workaround online to avoid an issue under Windows 10 which made the game unplayable, and it would still crash on being tabbed back in.  Hopefully the AC3 games will be better in that department when I get around to them.

Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #649 on: August 14, 2019, 05:01:10 PM »
Uncharted 1.  I bought the remastered trilogy for PS4 and just finished the first one.  It's a combination of shooting, parkour, and a few set piece sequences with their own mechanics.  I played on "normal" difficulty and found it slightly on the hard side.  I liked that the parkour animations were fast (compared to similar games like Tomb Raider or Zero Dawn); I did find that they were a little finicky and Nathan is pretty fond of leaping to his death.  I'm pretty terrible at aiming with a console controller, so I found the combat sequences difficult, but at least the format was pretty forgiving--your health regens after a few seconds if you stay behind cover.  Ammo was sometimes an issue in the later sequences.

The story was probably fine by the standards of 2007 but is pretty thin today.  Nathan gads around the world looking for treasure, self-defenses his way through a couple of hundred nameless goons(*), discovers that (MAJOR PLOT TWIST INCOMING) the treasure is cursed, fights the inevitable FPS fast zombies for a bit, then has to fight one of the few named goons to keep him from some vague plan to do evil with the cursed treasure.  Oh, and he gets the girl (who is at least pretty badass for a love interest slash damsel character).  The voice acting is good like everyone says.  I look forward to the second game since people say it was better.

(*) There has to be an indy game about managing the incredible number of mercenaries who throw themselves three to four at a time against heroes.  Payroll, food, lodging, hiring, trying to get life insurance claims paid as the hapless underwriters go bankrupt, stuff like that.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 08:55:45 PM by Marco »

Winston

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #650 on: August 21, 2019, 08:34:25 AM »
Sky: Children of the Light

This long review is yet another one cut-and-pasted from my blog.

thatgamecompany is known for making computer games for people who wouldn't otherwise be interested in computer games. Sky: Children of the Light is their attempt at making a MMO (Massive Multiplayer Online) game for people who would otherwise not be interested in MMOs. In my opinion, they did not succeed; if you're not already a gamer with some experience and/or aren't willing to face some bitter disappointments, you'll find Sky a difficult game.

The rest of this review contains spoilers, so: SPOILER ALERT! Since the game is meant to be played over and over again, at most I'm only going to spoil the experience of the first run-through. Or maybe I'll spoil the game by giving a critical review to what is may be a delightful MMO if I got over my own limitations. Once again: SPOILER ALERT!

Background

In the first thatgamecompany game I played, Flower, you play a breeze guiding a flower petal to gather more flower petals. It was delightfully non-competitive. You could revel in the beauty of the environment, blowing past flowers to make them bloom and collect their petals. For the most part, you were playing with the game and not against it.

Their follow-up game, Journey, had you making an epic journey through several worlds to get to a light on a distant mountain. It introduced player interaction: In the second world, you met another player who could accompany you on the trip. You could only communicate through simple beeps. Your behavior options were limited: you could help the other person progress, or you could ignore them and proceed solo. There were hazards to avoid in a couple of the worlds, but the worst that could happen is that you'd lose the ability to fly somewhat and you wouldn't be able to get some of the achievements.

When you complete Journey, you can play the game again. The incentive (apart from achievements) is that each time you'd meet someone else. Their behaviors could make each run-through different: Would they help you? Could you help them? Would they go off to journey solo? It didn't matter that much from a game-play perspective, since the game didn't require much skill to give a sense of satisfaction and completion. There was a zen-like quality to the worlds and the journey that made replays rewarding even if you didn't meet anyone else.

Sky is similar to Journey: You travel from world to world, heading towards a light in a distant mountain. Your key mode of transportation is based on your cape; as you travel, you collect items (in Sky these are the Children of the Light) to improve your cape and let you fly longer. The design of the worlds in Sky is very similar to the worlds of Journey: the desert world; the skiing world; the world where monsters attack you; the world of the tower; the struggle to reach the summit of the mountain.
Children of the Light

The differences between Sky and Journey begin with your cape. In Journey the cape was useful but not required; in Sky it's almost essential. Therefore visiting the Children and collecting their Light is a key component of the game. You can't even visit the final world in Sky without collecting at least 20 of them, and if you consult the hint guides they suggest collecting at least 40 or more because of the difficulty of that level. My own experience is that you'd want at least 50.

Collecting all that Light is important. As you might guess, some of the Children are easy to find. Some are in locations so obscure that even with a hint guide you might not be able to find them. And some are in locations that difficult to reach unless you have very precise control of your character.

In Journey, controlling your avatar wasn't difficult. In Sky, the difficulty of controlling your avatar is a complex function of environment, world, cape energy, and whether you've just been slammed by a creature (more on that below).

More than once I've tried to do some precision flying in an environment and just clip some surface. The avatar starts ping-ponging allow over the place, zooming uncontrollably, only able to turn slowly. If you were in the room at the time, you'd hear me screaming at my iPhone: "Why are you going over there? I didn't tell you go there! Why aren't you turning when I'm telling you to turn? Go up! I'm pushing the up button! Why aren't you going up? Why are you flying when I'm telling you to jump? Why are you jumping when I'm telling you to fly?"

It makes me glad my cat is almost deaf.

As you might have figured out from the paragraph above, right now Sky is only available for iOS, on iPhones and iPads. When iOS 13 is released later this year, it will be possible to use a PS4 controller with iOS games. Perhaps then I won't experience the frustration of trying to do precision movements on a touchscreen.

Hostile environments

As I said above, Journey had creatures that could damage your flying cape, but that wasn't important to the overall trip. Sky also has creatures that can attack you and steal your Light, but gathering Light is basically the goal of the game. If your avatar loses Light and therefore flying power, you might have to start the game again from the first world.

Unlike Journey, in Sky these creatures are in dark environments where the screen contrast is very poor, even when when I crank my iPhone's contrast to maximum. It can be hard to see the creatures, places you can hide, even exits from the area you're in. There are worlds where standing in water drains your Light away.

Once, I was knocked by a creature into a dark area, my flying gone. The pit was filled with water, surrounded by blobs of blackness. I watched my Light disappear. I didn't know what to do. (There's a Sky equivalent of a Hearthstone in World of Warcraft, but I didn't know about that option at the time.) I splashed around desperately, but there was no escape. Finally my avatar "died." I found myself in another world of darkness, though with stars in the night sky at least, until I finally figured out the direction I was supposed to go.

If you play a game like Dark Souls, this sort of thing is par for the course. It certainly doesn't match the zen-like joy of Journey or Flower. It's as if thatgamecompany was trying to appeal to both dedicated gamers and the audience for their other games.

Other players

In Journey, you could meet with at most one other player in a given world. In Sky, when you enter an area there can be up to five players initially, and up to eight total (there's a way to teleport to the location of one of your friends).

In the first couple of minutes of Sky, you're limited to the same level of communication with your fellow players as in Journey: beeps and sitting down. That rapidly expands as you encounter Spirits, also known as Emotes for their basic reward. A Spirit takes you on a small trip across the landscape, with varying degrees of difficulty depending on the world. At the end of the trip you receive a new gesture, pose, or sound effect for your avatar.

There are something like 36 Emotes in the game, so potentially you have access to a wide range of expressions. Often you'll see a group of players standing around in a common area showing off the Emotes they've acquired to each other. This sort of "playing around" is certainly not possible in Journey!

For more direct communication, there are chat benches in all the vendor areas of the game and scattered throughout the rest of the worlds. If two players sit on the same bench, they can type text messages to one another.

Another annoyance: The "microphone" key is not available on Sky's keyboard, so you can't use the iPhone's dictation feature.

For my part, I only found someone willing to sit on the bench with me twice. The first time they typed in Japanese. I tried to apologize for not understanding them, but they promptly left. The second time I was seeking help to get through one of the monster-laden worlds; the other player expressed ignorance and left before I could say more.

The next level of social interaction is to become Friends with another player. This costs a Candle (more on currency below). This allows you to assign a name to that player. For the few couple of Friends I took the time to compose names for them. After that I just hit "Randomize" for a quick name, so most of my Friends have names like Ewotuka, Acoc, Oyes, and Isefa.

The game is easier when you travel with other players. When you're close to another avatar, the cape energy passively regenerates. When you're Friends with another player, you have the option for one of you to hold the other avatar's hand and lead them, guaranteeing the energy regeneration. You can even form chains of up to eight avatars, each one clasping the hand of the next one. There are Children of the Light that are almost impossible to reach unless someone else is there to help you regenerate.

You can see an example of this in the (spoiler-laden) videos available in the Sky wiki: https://sky-children-of-the-light.fandom.com/wiki/Sky:_Children_of_the_Light_Wiki. In those videos, the player forms her own chain by playing Sky with four devices at once, regenerating cape energy rapidly.

All of this sounds wonderful, but there's a communications gap: Without text and with the range of Emotes available, you can't tell if someone wants to accomplish a game task or just wants to play around.

Here's an example: Someone offered to become Friends with me. I accepted. They offered to clasp my avatar's hand, and again I accepted. They promptly dragged me into the initial area of the most monster-laden world. Then they go of my hand. I interpreted this as they were asking for a guide to get through it. I knew something about the region. As I alluded above, I'm crappy at dodging the monsters and precision flying so I couldn't give them a complete tour, but I could offer something. I offered my hand, they accepted, and I took them deeper into the world.

It wasn't until we were deep into that world that it became clear that the other player wasn't looking for a guide, they had been looking to play with Emotes or something and had picked the most dangerous world at random. In a dark area, they activated a spell that made their avatar glow. This is a purely cosmetic effect; it does not illuminate your surroundings in any way. But in a dark zone, it made my iPhone's screen wash out with the bright glow. I could no longer see the dark terrain and the dark exit to get out of the dark zone. There was only the glow of my companion.

I didn't want to abandon them in a zone they didn't understand, but I was stuck fumbling around blind. I tried to initiate a text communication with them, but they refused. (I later learned that Japanese speakers are often embarrassed that they can't communicate with English speakers.) I continued to try to find a way out, but finally we met up with someone else who knew what they were doing and I joined them, leaving my first companion behind.

That's just one incident, and I've experienced others. The bottom line is that there's no way to express ideas like "Please, I need some help" or "Please, let me help you" or "I just want to dance" directly. You only have guesses based on behavior. In the incident I described above, I tried to be helpful only to come across as rude in the end.

Of course there are ways around this, but they're the standard MMO tricks. In this spoiler-laden video (https://youtu.be/Ah_-W3XKEfY, recorded just last night as I type this) you can see a Sky expert coordinating with her friends using some communications program; I can't tell if it's Twitch, Discord, or something else.

Eventually this will all shake down. Some standards will emerge and communities will form. Perhaps there will be default communication channels for each language. Something like this happened with World of Warcraft, except that WoW provided open text communication from the beginning, and servers were already segregated by geographic region. Maybe a sort of pidgin will evolve based on the available emotes.

This is far from the contemplative joy and basic companionship in Journey.

Currency

There are five currencies in Sky: Candles, Hearts, Ascended Candles, Seasonal Tokens, and Seasonal Candles. The last two are for cosmetic improvements only, so I'm not going to discuss them further.

Candles are the basic currency. Once you've interacted with an Emote and gained a new expression, that Emote becomes a vendor in a world's social area. Candles will let you purchase some upgrades for your avatar.

Candles are also the basis for social interactions between avatars. When you make an offer to become someone's Friend, the cost is one Candle. To upgrade interactions with that Friend costs more Candles. To be able to text-chat with that Friend costs yet more candles.

Candles can be forged by collecting wax from other candles in the environment (something I do in real life) and from other sources. It's possible to spend time in the game each day grinding for wax. According to one of the videos I linked above, you'd get about 15 Candles for two hours work each day.

Here's where the real-world money comes in the free-to-play app: You can also pay for Candles. For example, for $20 you can get 60 Candles (actually, it's presently 72 for $20 as a new-game promotion). That lets you make Friends freely and purchase quite a few minor improvements for your character.

You may ask, given that my critical review of the game thus far, did I resist paying for Candles? I've already confessed that I'm a former WoW pet collector, so you can guess the answer.

If you want serious cosmetic improvements to your avatar (hairstyles, masks, trousers, capes), you have to move to the next level of currency: Hearts. These items have no effect on the game. They're a digital good, like WoW pets, that solely affect the appearance of your character. The cost of new trousers might be 5 hearts; the price for a really nifty cape might be 30 hearts.

Hearts can't be directly purchased through real-world cash. You can purchase them from the Emotes/vendors at a price of three Candles for one Heart... once for each vendor. Since not every vendor sells a Heart, you might get 35 Hearts this way (at a total cost of 105 Candles, which takes us back to spending real-world money for Candles).

You can also get Hearts from Friends. If you send a Friend a bundle of three Candles, they'll receive a Heart. So the way to get Hearts is to give them. You send Hearts to your Friends and hope they'll reciprocate. Of course, there's no guarantee that this "investment" of Candles will pay back in Hearts, especially if you haven't paid Candles to initiate a text chat with that Friend to arrange any deals. You send out bundles of Candles and hope for the best.

This leads to another my criticisms of Sky, in the choice of their iconography. Suppose a newcomer to the game meets me. I could use someone else when visiting a difficult world, so I offer to be Friends with them. They accept, we travel around, I show them where some hidden Lights are. Later, I send them a Heart to see if we can work out an exchange.

Is this how they perceive it? There's nothing obvious in the game about the informal Heart economy. You can read about it in fan-based web pages (that's how I learned it) and it may be implied in the optional game tutorials (I haven't checked).

In other words, a newcomer adventures with a stranger for a brief while and later they get a Heart from them. It might be perceived as a creepy gesture. I wish the Heart wasn't a "heart" but some other icon without the same connotations.

That leaves Ascended Candles. They are a reward for going through the final world successfully; if you recall above, that's the one that requires at least 20 Light to enter. The more Light you enter that zone with, the greater the potential reward... if you can manage a challenging environment.

The Ascended Candles can be used to purchase "permanent" cape upgrades from the Emotes/vendors; most vendors offer one such upgrade and a couple offer two. Each upgrade means that when you start the game again, your cape starts out with additional Light. Overall, this gives Sky some of the visceral feel of Diablo: You go through the same adventure each time, but you get a bit more powerful and maybe you can handle some tougher challenges.

Ascended Candles can also unlock the most potent Friend option: To be able to Warp to a Friend's location within the same game world. Since Ascended Candles are so hard to get, I'd only use this option on someone I really, really trusted.

Unskippable Cutscenes

I wanted to mention the unskippable cutscenes in this review. Have I talked about the unskippable cutscenes yet? There are unskippable cutscenes. They're annoying after the first playthrough, especially if you're in the middle of a complicated maneuver that gets interrupted by an unskippable cutscene. There are skippable cutscenes, but not enough compared to the unskippable cutscenes. If you think this paragraph is wordy and annoying, just wait until you have to deal with the unskippable cutscenes.

Conclusions

I investigated Sky because a friend of mine was a big fan of Flower and Journey. They were looking forward to another game from thatgamecompany that echoed the meditative qualities of those two. I offered to test the waters for them and walk them through Sky when they were ready, as I had when I introduced them to Journey.

Sky: Children of the Light is not the game I think they were expecting. When my friend finally has the chance to sit down and play the game with me, I think they will be disappointed. It's not likely that they'll read this review (my blog is so obscure that not even my good friends read it), but I'll keep the critical tone out of my voice and let them make their own judgements.

I'm neutral on the monetization of the game. You can play Sky without spending a dime. You can forge your way through the game solo, get the 20 Light to be pounded in the final zone, emerge to see the game's ending, then never play again; I think you'd have more fun doing basically the same thing in Journey. You can also make Friends and gain Hearts by grinding for Candle wax, but you'll spend time instead of money.

I think my WoW friends would perceive Sky as a very light MMO. I can easily see some of them playing Sky with one hand as they tank Ragnaros with the other... if they cared to play Sky at all. There's definitely a market for people who like light MMOs; Second Life is one example. But I believe there's more to do in Second Life than there is to do in Sky.

Sky is too much of an MMO to be like Flower and Journey. I'm turned off by its occasionally frustrating controls, difficult environments, and player communication issues. I hoped for better from thatgamecompany.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2019, 11:19:53 AM by Winston »
Bill Seligman
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Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #651 on: August 31, 2019, 07:02:10 PM »
Inside.  This an artistic 2.5D puzzle platformer, currently free on the Epic store.  It's not long, probably in the 5-10 hour range (the Epic store doesn't track play time).  The story is wordless, creative, brilliant in its use of animation and sound, and highly disturbing.  The puzzles are also creative, clever in their use of a minimal control set (just directional movement, jump, and grab).  Some of the puzzles have timing elements, which could lead to frustration in some players.  Recommended if you don't get nightmares easily.

Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #652 on: September 06, 2019, 08:53:49 PM »
Uncharted 2.  Like everyone says, the second game was a marked improvement over the original.  The addition of Claudia Black to the VO cast was quite welcome, the set pieces were better, the story was a bit more interesting, and the fighting and climbing sequences were generally better.  The game's normal difficulty felt about right for me, but I dropped down to "easy" for the final boss battle because I didn't like its mechanics.  (Designing boss fights for games like this is always tricky.  If it's more of the same gameplay, it doesn't feel like a boss fight.  If it's markedly different gameplay, it doesn't necessarily fit the game's audience.)

Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #653 on: September 21, 2019, 05:24:56 PM »
Celeste (main storyline).  This is a high-difficulty 2D platformer.  It took me a little over nine hours and 2243 deaths (one every fifteen seconds, on average).  The game's graphics are relatively minimal and there is no voice acting, but there is a touching story and pretty great use of sound.  There is an "assist mode" for lowering the difficulty, which people have described as well-presented and flexible, but I didn't experiment with it.

Control-wise, the game leans heavily on midair dashes in one of eight directions.  Using an XBox controller, I frequently mis-aimed this dash, usually resulting in death.  Mis-aiming with the analog stick is common for me across many games, but it was especially a factor here.  I briefly tried playing with keyboard and mouse, but that didn't agree with me at all.

Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #654 on: October 15, 2019, 03:28:05 PM »
Doki Doki Literature Club.