Author Topic: Finished playing...  (Read 105016 times)

Winston

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #555 on: December 22, 2016, 03:37:31 AM »
Batman: The Telltale Series

Someone might reasonable argue that this isn't a game, but interactive storytelling. As you go through the game, you're offered a series of choices. The consequences of those choices affects what happens later in the game (e.g., if you're seen shaking hands with Carmine Falcone, that will make Gotham think less of you). There's combat, but no tactics: it's all in the form of QTEs, so combat plays out like a game of Simon Says.

With all that said, I enjoyed Batman:TTS. If the story is everything, at least they chose to tell an interesting story. It's set in Batman's early years, when Harvey Dent was still Bruce Wayne's good friend, and Batman meets Catwoman for the first time. A group called "the Children of Arkham" is terrorizing Gotham City, and it's up to Batman to try to stop them. Meanwhile, Bruce Wayne learns some uncomfortable realities about his parents and the source of the fortune they left him. 

The game spends a bit more time with Bruce Wayne than as Batman, and in some crucial encounters you can choose to participate as either one. It adds a dimension to the story that's not found in the Arkham series. On the other hand, there's no "open world" or detective puzzles to solve; your crime-scene detection is limited to linking various objects in static environments.

If I'm going to mention the Arkham games, I have to add that Catwoman is the same hyper-sexualized creature in both series. It's a shame, because she is more fully realized in Batman:TTS and this would have been a chance to show her in the same manner as the other female characters in the game (Vicki Vale, Officer Montoya). However, this is Bruce Wayne's story, not Selina Kyle's, and the game is clearly targeted at a male audience. It would have nice to have Batman be more acceptable to a female audience.

At its current price of $25, gamers may feel that the the series is too expensive for 5-6 hours of gameplay (about 60 minutes per episode). If you look at this as a choose-your-own-adventure story, then I think the price is reasonable compared to same amount of time spent in a movie theater. Certainly the story is better than a couple of the Batman movies I've seen.

The game has some replayability, to see what the results were of making different story choices. I've played it through twice, once as "good and noble" Batman, and once as "make every bad choice possible" Batman. I'll probably play it through one more time, to create a game save suitable for any follow-up Telltale seasons of Batman.
Bill Seligman
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Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #556 on: December 24, 2016, 04:56:42 PM »
Pony Island.

Well, that was a trip.  Reminded me a little bit of the old Mac game "3 in 3".

Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #557 on: March 13, 2017, 08:15:35 PM »
Lara Craft Go and Deus Ex Go.  These are puzzle games made for touch screen devices, presumably by the same studio.  Both are turn-based, and artistically reflect the theme of the game they are based on.  Some of the mechanical elements are the shared between the games, such as enemies who can be taken out from behind or the side, but will kill you if you step in front of them.  I never got stuck for too long on a puzzle, but plenty of them made me think for a while.  I thought Lara Croft Go was prettier, while Deus Ex Go told more of a story.

Winston

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #558 on: March 20, 2017, 10:14:43 AM »
Horizon: Zero Dawn

This is one where you play a savage hunter going after mechanical dinosaurs.

I'll start with what makes this game unique: the encounter mechanics. In H:ZD, you can't go toe-to-toe with a foe unless you're at least 10-15 levels above them, and often not even them. To deal with a given beast, you have scan them to learn their weaknesses (e.g., they have a canister that will explode if hit with fire), and come up with strategies for defeating them. The game does not force you into a particular strategy, it just provides you with a variety of tools, each with ammo of various elemental types (fire, shock, etc.): bows, tripwires, traps, and slings; there's even some machine-gun-like weapon that I never used. You typically sneak around, plant your obstacles, lure a mob to you, do some damage... then run away before it can attack you, wait until it's forgotten you're there, then head back to do more damage.

If you all you want to do is blast away at enemies, this is definitely not the game for you. If you like to play a game that rewards patience and strategy, it's a game to consider. For me, a player who has no twitch reflexes, it was a lot of fun.

This is an open-world game. After some initial tutorial quests, you can go pretty much anywhere you want, though the further you go from the starting areas the tougher the mobs get. There are the usual loads of side quests; I went on every one I found to out-level the main story content. There are also many types of collectables; my favorite was the Vantage, which gave you an overlay of the original high-tech landscape before the fall of civilization.

The graphics: This is a beautiful game on the PS4 (I don't think it's available on other platforms). The landscapes are lush, the details on the characters and the creatures are amazing. More than once I was befuddled by a shadow crossing the sky, then realize it wasn't one of the flying creatures, but the sun rising. The one drag on this realism are the cut-scenes, which occasionally demonstrate some graphics glitches.

The story: You play Aloy, who (after a bit of a tutorial) starts out as a 19-year-old outcast from the Nora tribe. As you proceed in your efforts to be accepted by the tribe, you gradually become aware that there's a destiny in store for Aloy, one that explains the mechanical creatures and the ancient remnants of a technological civilization that are all over the landscape. In the end, I liked the story; it did a good job of rationalizing the environment and tugged on my heartstrings as Aloy learned who she was and where she came from.

Diversity in gaming: Aloy is a 19-year-old woman, but none of her outfits looked anything other than practical gear. Several male characters (and at least one female character) attempt to flirt with her, but she has none of it: she's focused on the task at hand. There's an even blend of different human racial types represented. Aloy's one semi-romantic interest (it goes no farther than "I'd like to show you that cavern someday") is someone with a different skin color than hers. Like the recent Tomb Raider games, this game does well by the female lead (at least, according to this particular cis-gendered white male reviewer).

Final verdict: If you have a PS4, and you value patience in your game-play, this is a "must-have" game.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 12:55:50 PM by Winston »
Bill Seligman
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Winston

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #559 on: August 10, 2017, 06:03:28 PM »
Torment: Tides of Numenera

The story is set roughly a billion years in future. Humanity has spread out to multiple worlds and dimensions; the world is littered with old technologies and magics. You are the Last Castoff, a body that was left behind when the Changing God abandoned your body to move into another. That's "Last" in the sense of the most recent; there are many castoffs left behind by the Changing God. You have a sense that there's something important you must do, but you're not sure what it is or what the consequences might be.

This RPG uses the same engine as Pillars of Eternity (there's a whole topic on PoE else-forum); in other words, it's another modern descendant of Baldur's Gate. However, this is not just a duplicate of PoE. Here are the differences:

Pro:

- The quality of the writing. I originally kickstarted this game because I heard that Patrick Rothfuss had contributed to one part of it.

- There's no "good vs. evil" alignment. Instead there's a five-fold system of "Tides" (blue, red, gold, silver, indigo) each associated with a general pattern of behavior; e.g., the Gold Tide  is associated with doing good for others over their own welfare, which can make you a philanthropist or a crime lord working to help the poor in your community. Your actions determine your dominant tide, which affects how some characters react to you.

- You can get through almost every encounter without fighting. This doesn't mean you won't enter turn-based action mode from time to time, but instead of bashing the NPCs you can choose to have members of your party talk to different people at once.

- Stats are handled differently than other games of this type. There are only three: Might, Speed, and Intellect. These stats improve with experience, but in Torment they represent "pools" from which you can spend point on "effort" to increase your chance at success at various tasks. For example, if you have only a 50% chance of smashing a door down, you have the option of spending Might to increase that to 65% or more. The pools refill whenever the character rests.

- The skill advancement system is atypical, involving "Tiers". Within a given Tier, as you go up in level you only get to improve one of out a set of improvements: stat boosts, new abilities, etc. Once you improve your stats, for example, you have to level up to a brand-new Tier before you can improve your stats again. Of course, you can improve your stats as the last upgrade of a given Tier then improve your stats again as your first update of the next Tier. I found this to be a welcome change from the skill trees that have come to dominate computer RPG gaming.

Con:

- The game world is divided into areas, each with its own set of sub-areas. You can travel between the sub-areas freely (subject to the usual mechanics of "find the solution to the gate's puzzle"). But once you leave an area, you cannot return to it.

This means that if you leave an area with side quests you haven't completed (you can't leave an area without completing its main quests), then you can never complete those quests. In particular, if you leave the first area without filling up your party, you can never get new party members again. You get enough warning that it's not likely you wouldn't have a full party, but it's possible.

- There is no simple, direct way to determine how strong you are in a given Tide. For a stat that has such story importance in the game, it's strange that there isn't some indicator to suggest which Tide is dominant in you.

- The game feels shorter than Pillars of Eternity. This is good if you felt Pillars dragged on, or bad if you feel that it's too short for $60. (Of course, the price will go down with time.)

- The load screens between sub-areas are agonizingly long. There are quests that take you back and forth between areas, and I sometimes felt disinclined to complete the quest simply because I'd have to stare at load screens. (I played on a PS4; it may be different on desktop systems.)

Overall: I enjoyed the game. I became attached to some of the characters (especially Rhin, who is the one that Patrick Rothfuss wrote for). I appreciated the choice of whether to engage in combat or try to solve problems via negotiation or persuasion. I found the choice you face at the end to be interesting, and not a typical simplistic "good vs bad" situation.

Thumbs up if you enjoy Pillars of Eternity / Baldurs Gate style of games.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2017, 07:00:26 AM by Winston »
Bill Seligman
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Gwyddyon

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #560 on: August 14, 2017, 09:47:33 AM »
Prey: 7/10

This is a first person science fiction RPG like System Shock II and Deus Ex, made by the makers of Dishonored. It is just about exactly what you would expect except for the alternate history backstory. It was enjoyable but not revolutionary.

Halcyon 6 Starbase Commander: 8/10

This is a pixel-art olde-timey humorous sci-fi strategy RPG with resource management, worker placement, and turn-based 3-party RPG combat. I very much enjoyed it. They recently released a 'lightspeed' edition that cut the campaign length from about 35 hours to about 15, but you can play either version, basically accelerated or 'Long War' style.
Gwyddyon | Gwyllow | Gwyah | Gwystal | Eckhardt | Gwymbulvetr | Tethys | Gwynyang | Gwyabolic | Gwynchester

Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #561 on: August 20, 2017, 09:34:44 AM »
Rage (on normal difficulty; I don't plan to play further).  This game struck me as an uninspired shooter, outmatched in every department by other games of its time.  The setting is a vaguely interesting sci-fi story, but there is very little world-building compared to a Bioshock game.  You get a selection of different weapons and ammo and you can buy some upgrades, but armory management is far less interesting than in a Borderlands game.  Rage is presented as an open-world game, but the world is pretty small and (as far as I could tell) there's no reason to go anywhere besides a quest objective, so it brings none of the adventure of a Fallout game.  Other than enemy chatter, not much of interest happens while you're shooting your way through an area, which is a let-down in any game after Half-Life 2.  There is a bit of vehicle driving, which I mostly found to be an annoyance.  There is a card game, in case you suddenly decide that you'd rather be playing a simple CCG instead of a shooter.  The PC port was playable but rough around the edges at times.

The enemy AI was somewhat distinctive--most of the enemies you fight are pretty acrobatic and do a lot of ducking and weaving.  I could see a hardcore FPS fan finding that uniquely enjoyable on higher difficulties.  On normal difficulty, the enemies who stayed behind cover and shot at me didn't seem very challenging, but the ones who rushed in to melee attack could be tough.

Edalia

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #562 on: August 21, 2017, 09:44:16 AM »
Very good review, Marco. In fact, great reviews from Gwyd and Winston, too.

The Stanley Parable

Even though it's short, I didn't get to the end. I don't think I'll ever pick it up again, though. I put something like 1.4 hours into it (thanks Steam). It was a pretty cute walking game where you can defy the narrator (a standin for quest text or a tutorial) that did Escher-esque things with the level geometry (such as a turning a corner that converts the hallway you are going down into a seemingly endless loop). Ultimately, the repetition in the game got dull for me, and in the end there wasn't as much player choice as I would have liked. It was a decent afternoon, but not something I'll come back to.

If you have a hankering for a game that subverts video game tropes, I recommend the designer's follow-up, Dr. Langeskov, the Tiger, and the Terribly Cursed Emerald. That game is a bit wittier, shorter, and best of all, free.
o/\o

Winston

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #563 on: September 03, 2017, 12:12:30 PM »
Mass Effect: Andromeda

TL;DR: The gaming-review websites are right on this one.

Full review

As I continue my wowcation, I'm catching up on console games. I'm sticking to my resolution to play no game without a colon in its title. Fortunately, the game companies of the world do not disappoint in this quest.

I'm going to aim this review towards those who've played the other games in the Mass Effect (ME) series. If you haven't played any ME games before, I don't think this is a good place to start, unless you're utterly (and I mean utterly) dismissive of story and only play games for the combat. Yes, there's a codex and you can read the entries to fill in the background, but if you don't know why there appear to be no male asari, why female krogan are special, and which are the salarans and the turians, you'll have to read a lot to catch up.

The very beginning of ME:A is set between the events of ME:1 and ME:2, but it immediately jumps to 600 years later with arrival of inter-galactic arks from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy. After the usual "start with a disaster" and various soap-opera events, you play the role of Ryder, the human Pathfinder, charged with forging a home for the Milky Way races (humans, asari, turians, salarans, krogan) among the planets of the Heleus cluster within Andromeda. You quickly come into contact with an enemy race, the kett, and a potentially friendly race, the angaaran. You learn of an ancient and extinct race, the Remnant, and search among the ruins of their highly advanced technology, looking for tools to accomplish your missions.

Pros:

The graphics of this game are gorgeous. Bioware's effort in making use of modern graphics hardware is impressive. (The exception are the character figures, which still wander in the range of the uncanny valley.)

Your reaction to the game mechanics may vary from mine, since I played on the "easy" level and don't focus on min-maxing. I liked the fact that you're not stuck in your initial "spec" of Ryder, and can respend your skill points (for an increasing amount of credits each time) to play a different role if you choose. I played in Tech Spec, blasting away the enemy's shields, freezing them in place, and overcharging them to create combat combos. After about level 40 (I got to level 61 by the end of the game), you can even get enough skills in multiple talent areas so that you can shift between, for example, combat spec to biotic spec in the middle of a firefight.

In addition to the skill customization of Ryder, the graphics customization of Ryder is stronger than any previous ME game (though in line with Bioware's previous RPG-style game, DragonAge: Inquisition). I chose to play a female character named Angela Ryder (the last name cannot be changed) with dark skin, short auburn hair, and blue eyes. Par for the course, but the interesting twist is that in the game you will see images of your father, mother, and brother; the game does some "genetic extrapolation" so these characters generally resemble you. You're allowed to change your appearance (but not your gender) during the course of the game; I didn't test if your family changes with you.

Diversity in characters is well-represented. The starting members of your party are Cora, a Nordic-style blonde, and Liam, an African-American with a British accent. As in all recent Bioware games, you can explore romantic possibilities with most of the characters on your ship, the Tempest. I started with Cora, but she gently let me know she wasn't into women. I didn't bother with the other humans (Liam, Suvi, Gil) after that, because who wants a relationship with a human? I really wanted to hit it off with Vetra, a turian (in memory of Garrus) but she just stammered and didn't follow up on my interest. Finally I wound up with Peebee, an asari, who is by far the easiest character (in more ways than one) to hook up with, as long as you can deal with her annoying behavior.

Cons:

Your reaction to unskippable cutscenes may be different from mine. I mentioned the gorgeous graphics. The problem is that, if we're not talking about lovemaking, seeing the same gorgeous thing over and over again with no variation gets tedious after a while. One graphics transition was skippable (moving between planets within a system); the others were not (e.g., moving between stellar systems). In my last review, I complained about Torment's transitions between areas, but there you saw a load bar and knew it was the game doing some programmatic switching. Here it seems like the ME:A designers are just showing off the graphics processors.

Another problem is the story. My brief plot summary above may have seemed familiar to you, down to the roles that various races play in ME1-3. ME:A is definitely more of the same. You go on quests, you've got the character-loyalty missions (which reward the ability to purchase upper-level abilities for your party's characters), the ancient races are mysterious, the enemy is a bunch of mean bastards for you to mow down, you fight mini-bosses, etc. After seeing the same thing five or six times now (including the DragonAge games), don't expect to see anything different.

A criticism of ME:3 is that all the decisions Shepard made during the course of ME:1-3 had no difference in the outcome of the saga. It's hard to judge ME:A by the same criteria. You can make decisions that affect some NPCs and plotlines by the end of the game, but there don't seem to be any major consequences. (It's possible I'm missing something; I had a lot of allies along the way in the final battle, and it may be that your decisions would affect which and how many allies show up. Because I played in easy mode, the presence of  allies didn't mean much to me.) There are hints that some of your decisions would impact events in sequels, but Bioware has decided not to release any more patches or DLC for single-player ME:A. This not only means the "end" of the game (no dangling plot threads resolved), but probably the end (or a very long delay) for the Mass Effect series. Perhaps if the game were to have continued, your role-playing choices would have long-term consequences.

In the end, I enjoyed the game, primarily because the reviews on the gaming sites had lowered my expectations somewhat. Make no mistake: apart from the graphics and some game-mechanics tweaks, this is the same "Mass Effect" game, in both tone and plot, that you've experienced before. If you want to experience anything different, seek elsewhere.

« Last Edit: September 03, 2017, 03:03:47 PM by Winston »
Bill Seligman
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Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #564 on: September 04, 2017, 12:18:55 PM »
Octodad.  This was a short game, deliberately absurd both in its storyline and its controls.  The controls aren't as difficult as in some QWOP-like games, but working past them is definitely the challenge.  I enjoyed it.

Tweed

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #565 on: September 04, 2017, 04:18:45 PM »
>observer_

It's Blade Runner meets Neuromancer meets David Lynch meets Layers of Fear walking simulator. It's the grim cyberpunk future in Poland. You play a special type of police detective (voiced by Rutger Hauer!) called an "observer" who is able to "jack-in" to people's memories using a creepy invasive bio-modification. You've been summoned to a tenement bloc by your prodigal son and there stumble upon a series of crimes that you must investigate, primarily by scanning evidence and interrogating tenement dwellers. Scary, horrific shit ensues.

It's good! I don't like horror games generally but this one seemed intriguing and not too scary so I gave it a shot. It's fairly short, like, maybe 8 hours if you aren't obsessive about every detail and unlocking every achievement. The mystery is decent: I was able to predict the reveal part-way through, but piecing all the parts together was fun. The best part was the atmosphere and graphics. Bloober Team (the same Polish team that made Layers of Fear) did a really, really amazing job establishing the cyberpunk feel, and the "mind invasion" parts where you use your observer power are trippy and brilliant and cool.

Anyway, a good game if you're looking to play something scary once Halloween rolls around.

Marco

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #566 on: September 11, 2017, 06:16:52 PM »
Steamworld Dig.  This game was free on Origin, and probably still will be for a while.  It took me seven hours to finish, and I didn't feel like I was very efficient.  You're a robot who can dig with a pick-axe; you can bring back the ore you find and sell it to buy upgrades; these give you numerical power (more health, more damage, faster digging, etc.).  There are various monsters and traps around which can hurt you.  You occasionally find puzzle rooms, some of which give you new kit abilities like a drill.  Eventually there's a boss fight at the end.  For a short indy game, I thought it did just about everything right.

Winston

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #567 on: September 18, 2017, 02:39:31 PM »
Uncharted: The Lost Legacy

This is a "sequel"/DLC for Uncharted IV. Strictly speaking, you don't have to have played Uncharted IV to play U:LL; there are quick tutorial explanations for all the keypresses you'll need. As a practical matter, I think the game would be quite difficult without familiarity with the typical "tricks" needed to get through other Uncharted games; for example, there's no direct explanation of how to jump across a chasm and hook onto a porous surface with your piton.

The same applies to the game's story; there are enough references to previous Uncharted games that a new player might be confused by some of the cutscene discussion. However, the story is not a direct sequel and can be played independently. The plot: You play Chloe Frazier, from Uncharted II and III, and team up with Nadine Ross from Uncharted IV. Together you pursue the Tusk of Ganesh, trying to stay ahead of Asav, the villain du jour, mowing down his mercenaries.

U:LL offers a couple of new mechanics for Uncharted games: Chloe is able to pick locks (not much of challenge); there's an "open area" near the middle of the game where you can go where you want and encounter challenges in the order you choose. The open area includes a set of optional encounters/puzzles that, if completed, give you a fun-but-not-critical reward.

Otherwise the game offers the usual Uncharted game-play: platforming, puzzles, combat, and cutscenes. As in Uncharted III and IV, you can get through many combat encounters through stealth instead of blasting away with your guns. To its credit, the game has no "impossible" jumps nor any "memorize this trajectory" challenges which marred some of the previous Uncharted games for me.

The graphics are at least the equal of Uncharted IV, if not superior. Naughty Dog clearly gave this game their best effort in art design and detail. I played this game on the PS4, and I was pleased with what I saw on the screen.

At its current price of $40 you may find it a tad expensive for a game that took me 10 hours to play (on the Casual setting), but the price is certain to come down in the next few months.

My final verdict: If you're a fan of Uncharted and would like a bit more of the same, I recommend this game.
Bill Seligman
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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #568 on: September 19, 2017, 08:50:59 PM »
Dream Daddy: A Dad Dating Simulator
This came out a few months ago. It's a dating sim/visual novel style game (although it does have some mini-games in it.) You play as a single dad who is moving with his high school aged daughter to a new neighborhood in their town, which is, strangely, filled with eligible Also Single Dads You Might Want To Date. Gameplay is about evenly mixed between doing dad stuff with your daughter and going on dates with eligible dudes.

There were some bugs I ran into when I played (the game would sometimes forget choices you'd made -- assuming you'd gone out to the bar and met Robert when you'd slept in instead was the most frequent, but sometimes it would forget if your deceased spouse was male or female -- the bug seemed to happen [in different places] regardless of the original choice.)

Overall a pretty cute game (although both the Robert and Joseph paths can be... rough.) It's can be a bit saucy but it's not particularly explicit compared to similar games. (You get to see a couple potential datefriends in their underwear, and a few of the paths end in fade-to-black sex scenes.)

If you pick it up, I highly recommend both Craig's and Hugo's paths in particular. I thought it was pretty short (~8 hours to get 100% completion) for the price of $15, though, so I'd probably recommend waiting until it's on sale unless you're, like, really into one of those dads.



HIVESWAP: ACT 1
From 2009-2016, there was a webcomic called Homestuck. It's... complicated to describe, but roughly it's about four internet friends who play a game together that causes the end of the world. And then they accidentally glitch out their game so bad, it messes up another group's game, and they and the aliens playing that game have to band together to finally win the game. It's also a creation myth that's been referred to as the internet's Ulysses, but it's mostly dick jokes.

Hiveswap: Act 1 is the first part of a point-and-click adventure game based in the Homestuck universe. It's set in 1994, and is mainly centered on a 14 year old girl, Joey Claire (Extraordinaire), and her little brother Jude Harley (Bizarrely). (If you read Homestuck, they're the children of Jade's Grandpa.) Their home is suddenly attacked by monsters, and in the process of trying to get to safety, Joey accidentally activates a portal that transports her to an alien world where adults aren't allowed on-planet (Alternia), and transplants one of the kid aliens (Dammek) to Earth in her place. She befriends a local (Xefros) and they get involved in Some Shit that may involve rebelling against the Heiress of his planet. You get to ride a sweet deercat animal.

Act 1 was fairly short, and the difficulty was pretty low. I spent about 2.5 hours playing through casually, although I only got about 50% of the achievements and didn't explore everything yet. (People are reporting about 6-8 hours to 100% complete it.) However, it's part 1 of a 4 act game (And there will reportedly be a second game, Hauntswitch, which deals with Jude and Dammek on Earth.), so I'm not sure if difficulty/time investment will go up with future installments. Act 1 currently runs for $8, but cost might go down as part of a package as more acts are released.

It's got an E10 rating (very unlike the comic, which is, uh... pretty adult despite being about a bunch of kids/teens, at least as far as swears and violence goes.). And it seemed pretty accessible to non-Homestucks, although the fun of poking around the homes might be less interesting if you're not a comic reader. I didn't feel the jokes were too in-jokey; it was pretty funny on its own.  Should it matter, Joey seems heavily implied to be bisexual, and based on the comic and some commentary in game, it's a fair assumption that Xefros is also. (Alternian gender/sexuality/romance is way too complicated to get into here, but due to their weird biology, what humans would call bisexuality is pretty much the norm for their species.)

Also, the music is by some members of the original Homestuck music team: James Roach and Toby Fox (yeah, the Undertale guy), so it's got that going for it. (The soundtrack is Good. Also, the two aliens are in an alien garage band, so that's rad.)

I'd probably recommend waiting on more acts before buying it if you're not already on the Homestuck train though.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 04:13:09 PM by Honorata »
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Gwyddyon

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Re: Finished playing...
« Reply #569 on: October 05, 2017, 07:11:24 AM »
Divinity: Original Sin (Enhanced Edition) 8.5/10

This is a 3rd-person party-based epic-length CRPG with turn-based combat in the tradition of Baldur's Gate. It was on the whole very good, although often it tries to be all things at once, and never quite gets there. It has a very uneven difficulty which mostly settles down by the end.

Combat is turn-based, but not grid-based. Magic tends to leave ground effects, which then interact with other magic to form more and different ground effects. Example: There is a puddle on the ground. Fireball sets the ground on fire and evaporates the puddle into steam. Hitting the steam (or a target in the steam) with electric damage electrifies the cloud, stunning its occupants (including you). If instead you hit the puddle with ice damage, it would freeze and trigger knockdown effects when walking through it. This allows a great deal of tactical flexibility (and since you are usually outnumbered, area denial and CC are key). The experience is unique and IMO the best part about the game.

The writing is...so-so. Tries to be humorous, sometimes reaches clever, rarely laugh-out-loud funny. At the same time it tries to be epic and end-of-the-world serious. These goals often conflict. Voice acting is enthusiastic but not always great.

Gear is mostly random-affix Diablo-alike with a few 'uniques'. There is a completely superfluous crafting system. There are a *lot* of instant-kill traps, usually only circumvented by reloading and knowing where not to step. The soundtrack is IMO magnificent and I'm grumpy that I can't get it outside of a $70 collector's edition package.

This game took ~90 hours to complete, levels 1-20ish. There is now a sequel; I will probably get it when it is on sale.
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