Author Topic: Reading List Thread  (Read 13716 times)

Gwyddyon

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #15 on: May 18, 2010, 08:44:37 PM »
I was very fond of Stephenson's Cryptonomicon (and Snow Crash before it). I tried the first book of Baroque, but it inflamed my calculus nerve (which was injured in college) and I was unable to get through 50 pages. It sits, dust-covered, on my shelf.
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Marco

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #16 on: May 18, 2010, 08:49:04 PM »
Stephenson's writing alternates been great fun and total impenetrability, sometimes within the same book.

My favorite book of his is Zodiac, which is pure fun.  It's set in Boston and is pretty short.



Ramble

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2010, 06:44:59 AM »
Piers Anthony's Incarnation and Xanth series have alway been favorites of mine.  I donate most of the books I am not going to reread, and my Philip K Dick collection has remained intact for the better part of 20 years now.  I would higly recommend anything that he has penned.  In my collection, "Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said" is particularly dog-earred.

jsoh

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2010, 07:10:20 AM »
The Xanth/Incarnation series should only be read by those who do not react violently to puns. I read an awful lot of Anthony when I was younger, and while the aforementioned series are good (tho, the Xanth novels seemed to peter out after the 5th or 6th), I found his other stuff to be more interesting. Specifically:

* Apprentice Adept series (of which there are 3 more than I thought there were).
* Omnivore/Orn/0x.
* His xenoprosthodentistry short stories.

Anthony has also written some ahhh... "erotic" short stories of a highly disturbing nature. My 12-13 year old self found them fascinating, but as I think back to the content I die a little inside.

Gwyddyon

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2010, 09:40:19 AM »
I know I probably don't need to, but I will mention H.P. Lovecraft, simply because no one else has.

Favorites of mine:
At the Mountains of Madness
The Case of Charles Dexter Ward
The Color out of Space
The Dunwich Horror
The Shadow Over Innsmouth

It's probably worth mentioning that all of these can be found online, for free, because the copyright has lapsed over the past 90 years or so. You can also pick them up in various paperback or hardcover collections.
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Hotspur

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2010, 11:42:48 AM »
So...read any good books lately?

Before we get started let's just all assume that everyone has already suggested
GRR Martin, David Eddings, Tad Williams, Terry Goodkind, Steven Erikson and Robert Jordan, Mercedes Lackey, Neil Gaiman, JK Rowling, Tolkein, CS Lewis, Robin Hobb, Orson Scott Card and Raymond Feist

I don't see Robert Heinlein on there.  You're simply going to have to turn in your geek card.  :armscrossed:

Teasing aside, The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss is quite good.  Fair warning, it's book one, and there's nothing else out yet. 

Ramble

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #21 on: May 19, 2010, 12:07:14 PM »
Another standard in there that was missed...  William Gibson (at least a standard in my mind).

Wren

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #22 on: May 19, 2010, 12:22:54 PM »
So...read any good books lately?

Before we get started let's just all assume that everyone has already suggested
GRR Martin, David Eddings, Tad Williams, Terry Goodkind, Steven Erikson and Robert Jordan, Mercedes Lackey, Neil Gaiman, JK Rowling, Tolkein, CS Lewis, Robin Hobb, Orson Scott Card and Raymond Feist

I don't see Robert Heinlein on there.  You're simply going to have to turn in your geek card.  :armscrossed:

Teasing aside, The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss is quite good.  Fair warning, it's book one, and there's nothing else out yet.  

I tried to think of all the standard suggestions but I got tired :) I forgot Frank Herbert too. Also Patrick Rothfuss was kind enough to announce the publish date for book two now that he's far enough along in revisions that he could confirm things with his editor. March 2011.

I'm sad we have almost another year to wait but considering the book from all accounts (and photos) is ginormous and he has a new baby it's pretty understandable.

And it's because of his blog that I read Shades of Grey and The Warded Man so at least he's trying to ease the pain.

jsoh

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2010, 12:25:20 PM »
There is only one good Dune book. All others are lies spread by the filthy Harkonnen who would deny Paul Muad'Dib his due.

Brynndolin

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #24 on: May 28, 2010, 09:26:51 AM »
Hmm books.

If you haven't read Armor by Steakley yet, you should.

I love the Thomas Covenant, White Gold Wielder, books. Donaldson.

Farland's Runelords series were fun and good automoron reading. I gave up on them awhile ago though, due to constantly being irritated for the next one to come out. Not sure where they are now. But it was an interesting premise. Probably, like most fantasy fiction (sadly), an interesting idea milked for everything it was worth and then well beyond that.


There's another series I can't remember... hmm. Will look when I get home.

Wari

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #25 on: May 28, 2010, 12:21:50 PM »
I highly recommend Containment by Christian Cantrell, it only available as an eBook, it's either free or 99c depending on the format.  If you like Techno Thrillers, then you many like to try Anthony S. Policastro's Dark End of the Spectrum.  Another book I read this year that I liked a lot was Gary Hannen's Wet Desert.

Mr. Tring

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #26 on: May 28, 2010, 12:52:53 PM »
I am reading some books lately my brother has recommended as he has a pretty good bead on Sci-Fi material. One that I have finished recently is called 'Counting Heads' by David Marusek. I guess it's kind of an action story, it was most enjoyable.
Reading another one now called 'Accelerando' by Charles Stross. So far I like it, but I'm not far enough into it yet to know what it's about.

Fallowgrey

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #27 on: May 29, 2010, 04:33:24 AM »
I would be remiss if I didn't mention Tim Powers here.  You may only see one or two of his books on the shelves at Borders, but he's worth hunting for used.  For years every time I saw a used copy of On Stranger Tides, I'd buy it and give it to a friend: always worth it.  With a Pirates of the Caribbean movie coming out based on it, I'm hopeful it will be more easily found.  (The movie, well, I have hopes for, but not many after the last ones.)

I'm a fan more of his earlier work, when he was under a big Sabatini influence, but that's not to say Declare isn't a fantastic book.  Just don't start with Three Days to Never or Earthquake Weather.
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Olli

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #28 on: May 29, 2010, 09:36:43 AM »
I only made it about halfway through The Magicians before it got too pretentious and, for lack of a better term, "literary" or Catcher-In-the-Rye-esque for me. I think I read the first part (at the school) and got increasingly fed up and weirded out by it until I just couldn't focus/enjoy anymore and I didn't read part 2.

I agree with Wren that Mieville's Un Lun Dun is a lot like Neverwhere. I read the two books several years apart and I enjoyed Un Lun Dun, but it ended up being a slow read for me.

My personal favorite author is Jacqueline Carey - she has three trilogies set in an alternate-historical-fiction world. The first trilogy and to some extent the second has explicit as well as dark sexual content - on the other hand there's a lot of "traditional" fantasy I can't really enjoy because it's so violent, so I presume her stuff is not that bad as long as you're okay with the sexual angle (it's almost entirely consensual). (I always feel the need to Warn People What They Are Getting Into with these books, and then I read a recommendation from someone I know via WoW that's like two hundred pages of beheadings and rapes and I figure you guys don't care about a little sadomasochism, but you never know.)
The second trilogy gets a lot more gushy romantic near the end although there's still an epic fantasy storyline going on as well. The third trilogy is a little more mainstream so far (only the first book is out, the second is due in June). She also has a duology that's more traditional-fantasy that I haven't read, although it's supposedly not as good, and a complete genre switch in a paranormal/contemporary book called Santa Olivia.


Hjorolf

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Re: Reading List Thread
« Reply #29 on: May 29, 2010, 05:15:10 PM »
I just finished Barbara Tuchman's A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century which covers pretty much the title says. The particular interest is the way it follows the history by following French nobleman Enguerrand de Coucy, who was at least peripherally involved in almost everything important that happened. Next up is A Writer at War: Vasily Grossman with the Red Army, 1941-1945, a collection of Soviet frontline journalism.

Before that I recently had my periodic run-through of all the Aubrey/Maturin books, and Castles of Steel, a history of WWI at sea. (I have the whole set of the Patrick Tull narration of the A/M books- I find they listen even better than they read.)

Back to SF, if you either really like or really hate spaceships (because he blows up a lot of them), David Weber's space-navy stuff is pretty good, though the later Harrington books have been tugging increasingly hard on my disbelief suspenders.